"Hold Everything Dear" - essay by Lisa Sharp

( )

parenthesis of eight spaces

Hold Everything Dear is a call. A call sounding at variable volume, tone and modulation; anything from an injunctive invocation cried out loud to to something more like a muttering to oneself. This is the setting for the varied works in this exhibition. Eight artists present works that veer between the direct and politicised to the intimate and nuanced. These artists have responded generally to the call to hold everything dear and more specifically, to the eponymous book of essays by Berger (2008).* There is a sense of pause too – of restrained urgency and reflection, as while the Berger writings are lucid they are also overwhelmingly anguished and were published well over a decade ago. In many ways this exhibition is an opportunity for crafting a wealth of visual responses to the despair of contemporary terrorism, occupation, war and ethics of global power in the intervening time. Facing the enormity of such issues, in an era of increasingly fragmented and globalized humanity, the art made simply reflects the human range.

As a country was invaded, and with no peace in sight, an artist wrote to John Berger, The world today is hard to look at, let alone think of**. And yet, this is what artists do. What is it to Hold Everything Dear?

There are certain moments of looking at a familiar mountain which are unrepeatable. A question of a particular light, an exact temperature, the wind, the season. You could live seven lives and never see the mountain quite like that again; its face is as specific as a momentary glance across a table at breakfast.

While mountains are massive, immovable (perhaps even immortal) there is this overwhelmingly tender observation - that which is valuable, precious, held dear, the Everything – is not only faceted but is nearby, in daily lives and histories. This is also a feature of the Berger book; where we are led to face a mountain of pain, to ask how to continue without any plausible vision of the future? A stark question, placed beside lines of achingly lovely poetry (by Gareth Evans) for gentle answer;

the jug of this life, as it fills with the days / as it sinks to become what it loves***

Murray’s Study for the Miner’s Hut fixes the gaze on the mountain as a heap of coal - a dark, loaded and heavy history of coal dependency. By tying titles to hashtags and contested mine sites, the work directly references contemporary sites of contest and activism around coal mining. While the hard-edged geometric forms, the warning colours of black and red signal the language of protest and of clear-cut positions on the issue (#keepitintheground), these are ameliorated by materials and context. RAM Board is a temporary flooring product, produced from recycled elements, the paint is a gloss Weathershield and the miner’s hut itself is no longer in use, but a historical museum display in Sydney’s Blue Mountain, elements which suggests the future is fraught and intertwined with a myriad of other environmental issues.

A number of the artists have utilised recycled and found materials or objects to allude to the passing of time, the prevalence of memory and to evoke a sense of loss and nostalgia for place and people. This repurposing is a way of reseeing the mountain. Materials such as paper, textiles, leather, timber and glass are versatile for their ability to hold time within; marks of wear becoming a part of its structure. Through processes that are tactile and draw on craft traditions, they offer a chance to leave traces of the hand, as touch.

Belgiorno’s work Vessels is an installation of seedpod or cocoon-like objects, hollow and torn open, suspended from branches. As dried and hollowed husks these organic forms seem to reference a past time of fertility or fruiting while their present barrenness suggest vulnerability and perhaps, function also as metaphors for the uncertain present. Washi paper, itself handmade, was sourced from drawings, dampened and torn to transform into remade forms. In this way the torn drawings (of valued objects) are a condensed material archive of the past but also, contain the observation that mere things are ephemeral and transient. The forms deliberately mirror and repeat familiar natural ones, the rounded surfaces, earthy palette and uneven textures so descriptive of life cycles, reproduction, renewal and healing.

The innate tactility of textiles and their ability to describe the comfort of touch is also present in Burgess’ Fit our vision to the dark, an installation about home. Using the malleability of fabric and the scale of the louvre windows in the artist’s own home, the work forms an impression of architecture-as-memory. The window, a structure for looking outward, from a safe place into an uncertain one is echoed, but in tulle and distorted timber. Working from a deeply personal context, of a home about to be vacated, Burgess conjures that which is dear when physical spaces are left - the warmth of of domesticity, of humans filling architecture, of our need for shelter deepened by the joy of familial rhythms, peace, connection and the growth of children into adults. Foreshadowing loss and its attendant anxiety, the window is the setting for seeing that dark mountain; the sheer quality of tulle and the misshapen grid making the view beyond hazy and indistinct.

The Contemplation of Loss by Fernando takes the form of delicate new life – green shoots sprout freely from a clay cooking pot that was used in the artist’s father’s restaurant. The death of a parent and the inevitable legal and other formalities that followed, led to a series of artworks that literally grow from loss as seeds are sown on to paper pulped from shredded copies of the artist’s father’s last Will and Testament. As the seeds are watered, plants grow from the document. Grief, private and public, emblematically return the text to soil while the fecundity of growth reveals the continuance of life, renewal and hope. This contemplation imbues the personally felt loss with the empathy of shared celebration.

Hold everything, Dear / Discard something inexpensive / Keep something special / Forsake nothing precious / Hold, everything dear! In Burdett’s own words, the cadence and emphasis shifts – it is all a question of nuance and intonation. Describing the array of materials presented in the work as originating from the fragmented diaspora of the artist’s own existence: the collected objects, images, bones, hides, rural fragments, artefacts, slogan-like snippets of text, textures and crafted textiles are displayed in considered arrangements. This, and the uniform palette of antique patina lends the work the quality of a diorama or movie set, and the narrative proceeds outwards from the autobiographical to the communal, from a life to lives, from the personal to the political and from the symbolic to the real. Wearing the marks of age, there is a chair for sitting and looking, and bizarrely, a Mexican puppet that looks back (for the artist, a personal symbol of the voyeur).

Running through Berger’s essays are deeply felt personal stories: the devastation of loss mingled with the warmth of family comforts and transformative art and poetry. Other artists in the exhibition seek to access and portray the human condition by depicting and engaging with familiar human narratives, essentially stories of people.

Meisner’s work consists of small-scaled human figures, photographic prints enlivened by brightly coloured layers of collaged fabric in Perspex. Standing on plinths, these figures move us back and forth between considering the individual and the crowd. Somehow, they are at once anonymous and recognisable, collective and differentiated, achieving an oscillation of form and concept. Driven by a strong sense of empathy and concern for the global phenomena of displaced populations, Meisner works inwards from these broad themes to consider the impact of forced relocation, migration or simply movement, on the individuals photographed. Humans and humanity are depicted in a permanent state of contemplative transit.

Connolly’s figurative paintings and sculptures are influenced by an ongoing interest in folk, tribal, primitive and outsider traditions of figuration. These human and quasi-human figures are depicted in an active chaos of bright colour and texture, displaying energetic mark making and a variety of materials. Paint, collage, wire and ceramic elements are meshed, woven and joined together. Most of the figures feature an open mouth and it is interesting to imagine them giving full voice to the exhibition title, Hold Everything Dear, in full throated chorus.

Lees will be making an interactive work, engaging with visitors to the exhibition, here and now. Building on a recent participatory project in a hospital environment, Lees intends to make a wall of written notes; A Little Good for this gallery within a school. The invitation (also issued over social media) is for people to share the good by contributing a sentence describing a particular moment that has brought joy. These will be displayed and transcribed as the exhibition progresses. Lees sees her work as a balm to the prevailing stream of negativity in the media. The pause, to be created by the work, will be time - time to sit, reflect and write, enabling not just the artist’s hand, but a host of other hands, to be visible in the final work.

This exhibition can be seen to function as a Greek chorus. They look at the mountain. They cannot affect the outcome of what is being shown. They do not interpret. They question, listen, observe and then give voice to what the viewer may, more or less inarticulately, be feeling.****

8 voices; female voices, singing hold everything dear.

* Berger, John, Hold Everything Dear - Dispatches on Survival and Resistance, 2007: Vintage Books
(2008), New York, USA
** Ibid. 55
*** Extract from Gareth Evans, Hold Everything Dear for John Berger (2005), Ibid. viii - ix
**** Berger, Ibid. 87

Ro Murray Study for Miners Hut I,II 2019 collage on Ram Board, each 92x280cm

Ro Murray Study for Miners Hut I,II 2019 collage on Ram Board, each 92x280cm

Five artists come together to reflect through their art on what it is to be living in these rapidly changing and seemingly unstable times, in a visual ‘falling down’ and ‘gathering up’. Unified by concept, differing materials, processes and approaches are used to narrate the rhythms of falling, then rising, leading to contemplations on resilience and community. The works range from fragile paper drawings, enigmatic sculptural objects, large graphic installations, colour constructions and performance.

Five artists come together to reflect through their art on what it is to be living in these rapidly changing and seemingly unstable times, in a visual ‘falling down’ and ‘gathering up’. Unified by concept, differing materials, processes and approaches are used to narrate the rhythms of falling, then rising, leading to contemplations on resilience and community. The works range from fragile paper drawings, enigmatic sculptural objects, large graphic installations, colour constructions and performance.

#hashtag

Over March, Ro worked at the art residency BigCi Bilpin in preparation for her installation #keepitintheground selected for Sculpture at Scenic World opening 12 April. Study for the Miners Hut

Ro’s Artist talk at the BigCi open day.

Ro’s Artist talk at the BigCi open day.

#keepitintheground at the Miners Hut, Katoomba.

#keepitintheground at the Miners Hut, Katoomba.

Murray & Burgess - Sort it Out

Ro and Mandy Burgess start Factory 49  calendar with their installation sort it out Opening 6-8pm Wednesday  January 30. The collaborators extends the act of making into a challenge to document the content of their yellow bins. They playfully approach sculpture using discarded rural metal fragments to make seven symbolic open vessels. Their process-oriented constructions are drawings in space.  

Sort It Out

Sort It Out

The collaborators have been accepted finalists with Fortress for the North Sydney Art Prize, the Coal Loader Site at Waverton, opening 2 March until 17 March. ‘Fortress’ is a mini forest of seven dead trees with yellow wooden tree collars as a stark reminder that the environment needs protection from the damaging effects of man-made climate change. There will be more frequent and extreme temperatures and winds which will cause devastating bushfires, droughts and cyclones.

December 2018

2018 had an exciting finish to the year for Ro with works on her dead-filed architectural negatives selected for several art prizes.

Midden  2017, ink and collage on tracing paper, 74x140cm, was selected finalist for Blacktown City Art Prize, image credit David Roche

Midden 2017, ink and collage on tracing paper, 74x140cm, was selected finalist for Blacktown City Art Prize, image credit David Roche

Beside the Park  2018, dye sublimation print on aluminium, was selected finalist for Greenway Art Prize

Beside the Park 2018, dye sublimation print on aluminium, was selected finalist for Greenway Art Prize

Section CC  2017, ink and collage on tracing paper, 72x100cmm, was selected finalist for Grace Cossington Smith Award

Section CC 2017, ink and collage on tracing paper, 72x100cmm, was selected finalist for Grace Cossington Smith Award

Following her Solo exhibition at Factory49, Ro continued to develop her red and black geometric series. #liddell acrylic mural on marine ply (five panels), 240x600cm, carpark of Look Printing, Albion Street Leichhardt.

Following her Solo exhibition at Factory49, Ro continued to develop her red and black geometric series. #liddell acrylic mural on marine ply (five panels), 240x600cm, carpark of Look Printing, Albion Street Leichhardt.

#yallourn  acrylic mural and assemblage on timber, 240x260x360cm, Office Showroom Factory49

#yallourn acrylic mural and assemblage on timber, 240x260x360cm, Office Showroom Factory49

6.jpg

Here and There

2018  AUGUST

Exciting new exhibitions and art prize in August/September.

I have an OPENING 6-8pm WEDNESDAY 1 AUGUST, dual exhibitions of my geometric series, in the Office Space and on the Outside Wall at Factory 49. Otherwise come and see me in the Gallery 1-6pm Thursdays.

   
  
    
  
   Normal 
   0 
   
   
   
   
   false 
   false 
   false 
   
   EN-AU 
   JA 
   X-NONE 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
     #hazelwood 2018, acrylic wall mural Factory 49

 #hazelwood 2018, acrylic wall mural Factory 49

Here and There is a series of collaged tissue paper on my architectural negatives OPENING 22 AUGUST at  Home@735. Three are tracing paper and three dye sublimation prints on aluminium.

   
  
    
  
   Normal 
   0 
   
   
   
   
   false 
   false 
   false 
   
   EN-AU 
   JA 
   X-NONE 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
    Ro Murray Rosalie meets Henri at the Fishmarket 2017 paper collage and ink on tracing paper, 59x42cm print on aluminium

Ro Murray Rosalie meets Henri at the Fishmarket 2017 paper collage and ink on tracing paper, 59x42cm print on aluminium

Part of this series is the triptych Midden, which was selected Finalist for Marie Ellis Prize for Drawing 3-17 August, Queensland College of Art, Griffin University, Brisbane.

Chrissie Cotter Gallery group exhibition “A Little Death” with Elizabeth Rankin, Kirsten Drewes, Ro Murray and Mandy Burgess. OPENING 6-8pm WEDNESDAY 5 SEPTEMBER, until 16 September. Unfortunately, I will be away for this show, but it will be worth seeing.

Factory 49, Marrickville

“What were they thinking” acrylic on plywood, wall installation 2.4x3.5m at Factory 49. Following my exhibition in April at Factory 49, I have been asked to join the Management Committee.

With another wall work installation to be part of the  group exhibition opening 20 May until 2 June, 49 Shepherd Street Marrickville with some fellow committee members Molly Wagner (molly_L_wagner), Jac Fontaine(j.font.art), Tara Lyubicic (taralyubicic).

2_RoMurray.jpg

March 2018

Ro’s new body of work, The Architects Negative, lino prints on her dead filed architectural plans was part of the group exhibition INHABITED ARCHITECTURE at Chrissie Cotter Gallery, sponsored by Inner West Council during March. Fellow artists were Susan O’Doherty, Mandy Burgess, Freya Jobbins.
 

   
  
    
  
   Normal 
   0 
   
   
   
   
   false 
   false 
   false 
   
   EN-AU 
   JA 
   X-NONE 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
    RM (left) artist’s talk Chrissie Cotter Gallery

RM (left) artist’s talk Chrissie Cotter Gallery

   
  
    
  
   Normal 
   0 
   
   
   
   
   false 
   false 
   false 
   
   EN-AU 
   JA 
   X-NONE 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
    A4 to A1

A4 to A1

The lots of Art Prize selections for April and May for Ro: Section CC for Wyndham Art Prize and Swan Hill Print and Drawing Prize in Victoria. And the Murray Burgess collaboration: Sculpture at Scenic World and Sculpture Other in Katoomba.

November 2017

THE TWINS was included in the Sydney Story Factory auction if you can tell a story… 2017, which raised $80,000 to run writing programs for kids across Sydney. The response to The Twins “You can hear everyone screaming at the horse at the grand ball. It’s hilarious” - James from Woolloomooloo.

SECTION CC 2017, ink on paper, 76x93cm
Or death to the plastic drinking bottle, a homage to the thousands of plastic water bottles that go to landfill or are dumped in the ocean, on one of my dead filed architectural drawings from a past life.

Finalist Greenway Art Prize 2017

cc.jpg

 

Art For the Planet

Over October Ro and artists Jane Gillings, Dean Sewell and David Cragg, were featured in the public art exhibition ART FOR THE PLANET at Darling Quarter, curated and produced by aMBUSH Gallery.

IMG_7099.jpg

Ro’s work sort to expose the ongoing and often hidden destruction of wilderness areas caused by long wall coal mining. The sculpture/paintings Banksia sculptorii and Araucaria explorii , oil on plywood, are a fusion of human and tree. They represent Rae and Yuri Bolotin, whose property is opposite Wollemi National Park, adjoining the Garden of Stones National Park. And the river ran black…a work of mixed media on paper – features drawings that interpret Yuri’s mapping project , where notable landforms in the garden of stones is given a presence by naming them, to help preserve this world Heritage Wilderness from destruction. 

The river ran black

The river ran black

Banksia sculptorii.jpg
Araucaria explorii

Araucaria explorii

EXHIBITIONS ON THE NORTHSIDE OF THE HARBOUR

Ro coordinated eleven artists in a group exhibition “Another Perspective with Paper” at Grace Cossington Smith Gallery Wahroonga during July. The artists were Mandy Burgess, Marguerite de Fondaumiere, Wendy Edwards, Renuka Fernando, Lisa Giles, Tilly Lees, Pamela Leung, Jacqueline Maureira, Ro Murray, Mirra Whale, Lisa Woolfe, and curated by Christiane Keys-Statham.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-AU 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
  Coal Fired mixed media 2015-17

Coal Fired mixed media 2015-17

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-AU 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
  Boy on the Pony I and II, drawing on lithograph 2017

Boy on the Pony I and II, drawing on lithograph 2017

Willoughby City Council as part of the Willoughby Visual Art Biennial commissioned a new work by Ro for an installation in the Council Foyer, on view over September. The installation Coves, Cliffs and Creeks is drawings and sculpture in the two glass cabinets, the wall and the glass Entry Doors.

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-AU 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
   (detail) acrylic marker, acrylic 2017

 (detail) acrylic marker, acrylic 2017

Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-AU 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin-top:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-right:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
	mso-para-margin-left:0cm;
	line-height:107%;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}
 
   (detail) ink and acrylic on rag paper 2017

 (detail) ink and acrylic on rag paper 2017

CHRIS O'BRIEN LIFEHOUSE RPA

As part of the art health program at the cancer clinic, Ro undertook a three-week art residency with Arterie over June 2017, painting on the glass walls around Chris O’Brien Lifehouse. The project is a development of her project PROFILE2050 at RPA Hospital last year, where Ro profiled by marker pen eighty-one people on glass, Portrait1952 profiles forty-five people in acrylic paint, with the first letter of their name and year of birth.

 

THE SPACE BETWEEN US

This group exhibition with Murray and Burgess, Deborah Burdett, Susannah Williams, and Renuka Fernando at Chrissie Cotter Gallery in Camperdown end of April was a development of their work from their exhibition The Waiting Room at Articulate Project Space. Murray and Burgess continued their development of home/homelessness with Passage. A labyrinth of spaces, lightly screened off with green fabric, strangely connecting to the tennis courts outside the French doors. With thanks to Inner West Council for their sponsorship. 

 

Work Around The Parramatta River

Two more outside installations by Murray and Burgess. The hydro stone figures The Battlers, who represented the women who saved Kelly’s Bush at Hunters Hill from development, and the first green ban, was selected finalist for Harbour Sculpture at Clarkes Point Woolwich in March. also selected was Ro’s work Araucaria explorii, a painted plywood silhouette of Yuri Bolotin, the conservationist for the Garden of Stones National Park, for the Inside Works exhibition.

The cluster of nine women and four children was also selected by Inner West Council for Art on the Greenway, on Hawthorn Canal near Lilyfield Bridge, appropriately amongst the trees by the water.

North Side Art Prizes

March is a busy month for Murray and Burgess with the installation of new works on the harbour.

The biennial North Sydney Art Prize is at the Coal Loader Centre for Sustainability at Balls Head - opening 11 March. Murray and Burgess were selected finalist for the stacked hydro stone hands We are all the Same. Ro’s eleven painted silhouettes No Place for Children is also a finalist, installed in the tunnel. This is an exciting place to explore with works in the newly excavated chambers of the adjoining tunnel. Daily 10am - 5pm, 11 - 26 March 2017.

Come visit Harbour Sculpture at Clarkes Point Reserve Woolwich to view Murray and Burgess' new work The Battlers in the trees and homesweethome in the Deckhouse. Ro’s work Araucaria explorii has also been selected. Ro will be on site 11.30am-3.30pm Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 April. The exhibition runs 16 March - 2 April 2017.

Murray and Burgess testing green fabric for The Battlers. Read this about this land mark ruling. 

The Waiting Room

Ro and Mandy coordinated a group exhibition The Waiting Room 3-19 February 2017 at Articulate project space with fellow NAS Grads Deborah Burdett, Renuka Fernando, and Susie Williams. Bridging by Murray and Burgess develops further the concept of home/homelessness, with regard to waiting in offshore refugee detention centres. 

Fictitious Botanical Names

My plywood profiles have developed as landscapes through paint and truncation.

Araucaria explorii 2016 started with the figure of Yuri Bolotin the co-director of BigCi, during my artist residency November 2015. Yuri explores names and records The Gardens of Stones. The work was developed for Harbour Sculpture at Woolwich 16-26 March, installed inside at the Deckhouse. Also was selected the canvas framed homesweethome by Murray and Burgess, and our hydro stone figures The Battlers, a work in progress.

The diptych Wollemia vanessii 2016 also started at this residency at BigCi. The documentary film maker Vanessa Macedo was the winner of the Environment Prize at BigCi. Vanessa made a short advocacy film for the conservation of the Garden of Stones against coal mining.

The hydro stone hands by Murray and Burgess have been refigured to We are all the Same at North Sydney Art Prize at The Coal Loader Site for Sustainability at Balls Head. Opening Ceremony 2pm Saturday 11 March.  Also selected is my installation of eight figures No Place for Children.